my top three rom-coms of the post-2010 era

Romcoms lived their golden era in the 90s and 00s. Loved for their idealistic yet relatable plots, these movies are cult favourites. But in a world where our screens are dominated by the likes of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Games of Thrones and Stranger Things, postmodern romcoms need to keep up with the big-guns, or risk being left behind.

Admittedly, rom-com isn’t my favourite genre, but I like to believe that just means I’m more critical about what makes one good. Heres my top three romcoms (in no particular order), perfect for your next night in:

Crazy Rich Asians (2018)

Director: Jon M. Chu; based on the book by Kevin Kwan

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Rachel Chu (Constance Wu) finds herself a fish-out-of-water when she visits her boyfriend Nick Young’s (Henry Golding) family home in Singapore for a friend’s wedding. Surrounded by unexpected affluence Rachel must navigate a viper’s nest of jealous socialites and controlling family if she wants to keep her relationship intact.

The epitome of contemporary rom-com, this movie is steeped in culture in a way that elevates the story beyond the simplicity of the typical American romance feature. It is enriched by nuances of family, tradition, duty and familial love which all play significant roles in Rachel and Nick’s relationship, as well as the other key romances in the story. This movie also has a lot of sass, and some great comedic moments—its impossible not to love.

Me Before You (2016)

Director: Thea Sharrock; based on the book by Jojo Moyes

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The effervescent Lou Clark (Emilia Clarke) becomes the caregiver for the paralysed and rightly cynical Will Traynor (Sam Claflin). The pair grow together as they learn about what makes life beautiful.

This movie takes your standard B+ romcom to the next level. The love, the heartache and the laughs are crafted in together seamlessly in a story I could watch again and again. Lou’s quirky charm and Will’s sardonic wiles make for a couple the audience can’t help but cheer for. Its an all-round take on the classic rom-com. Keep tissues on hand for this one.

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before (2018)

Director: Susan Johnson; based on the book by Jenny Han

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Lara Jean Covey’s (Lana Condor) private letters to all the boys she’s ever loved are exposed to them without her knowledge. Havoc ensues as her love life spirals beyond her control.

Possibly the greatest high-school set rom-com of all time (big claim, I know), this movie is literal crack. Everyone loves a rom-com with tension, where the main couple are so perfect for each other and they don’t even realise it until things start to get in their way. This movie has that in spades, but its also so much more. It breaks the stereotypes of teen romance, friendship and family relationships in cinema. It’s worth noting that this also has the most stunning cinematography of any movie on this list.


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‘cursed child’, not so cursed after all

An Aussie reviews Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

I had my doubts when I first heard that Harry Potter was set to become a play. Being so in love with JK Rowling’s ‘Wizarding World’, it’s hard not to feel protective. The books—excellent. The movies—cult favourites. And since then, a slow trickle of ‘HP’ culture in various forms. Some good, some bad. BUT, a play is a big deal, particularly if Queen Rowling herself has a hand in it, because that means canon and that means us Potterheads would have to accept whatever story we get—whether we liked it or not.

This whole venture was not off to a good start. With the release of the play’s transcript, outcry was rife across the globe.

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People seemed determined to hate it, citing many a plot-hole and narrative confusion as their justification, forgetting that they were reading a script, not a novel. Naturally, it’s difficult to get a real sense of the story when all you have to go off of is dialogue. There’s no immersion into the setting, no characterisation, no tension.

To prevent myself from succumbing to this conflict, I had to make a deal with myself: hold off judgment until I could see the play. At least this would allow me to experience the story in its final form, permitting fair judgment. Still, I had low expectations.

As I sit here writing, not ten minutes after the curtain fall, I find it hard to wipe the smile from my face; to quell the feeling of exhilaration welling in my chest. A feeling one only gets upon experiencing something wonderful. Something magical.

And truly, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child was special. After spending four and a half hours immersed in the story, I feel like I know these new characters (and old) as dearly as I did The Boy Who Lived all those years ago.

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Our leads, Scorpius Malfoy (William McKenna) and Albus Severus Potter (Sean Rees-Wemyss), were the perfect combination of loveable and whimsical. They gave a modern and hilarious twist to the teenage perspective of love and family; themes which have always been at the crux of Rowling’s stories.

I have to admit, it’s weird to see Harry Potter (Gareth Reeves), and the rest of our old-faves, all grown up and dealing with real adult (TM) problems. I was worried that, since the actors weren’t the same as the ones I grew up with on the big screen, I would feel a disconnect. In light of that, I was shocked how even through the medium of theatre, I could feel their heartache and loss, and it made this play all the more beautiful—

— it was a melting-pot of comedy, charm, adventure, love and pain. A beautiful addition to the tales which many hold dear, and so far from the disappointment I was concerned it would be. So far from what many people believe it to be. I highly recommend to anyone who can, go see this play and feel the magic as I did. It’s as close to re-experiencing Rowling’s magic for the first time as you’ll ever get.

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Other things I loved: (SPOILER ALERT)
  • All of the special effects! But I can’t tell you… #keepthesecrets
  • The score. The music was so beautiful, it elevated the emotion of the story ten-fold. My personal favourite, ‘Staircase Ballet’
  • Moaning Myrtle!! So flirty 😏, the best evolution of her character so far
  • Scorpius in general: so funny, so awkward, so sweet—the epitome of a precious boi
  • That feeling of sadness and heartbreak when Harry watched Voldemort and his parents, so real and visceral
  • The dementors (everywhere!)
  • Snape, spot on with the voice; definitely had the potential to be a real ‘hit or miss’ character–big, big hit on this occasion
  • Draco Malfoy, so much like his father, Lucius, yet so different at the same time both visually and personality-wise—loved seeing his relationship with his own son, Scorpius
Things that could have been better:
  • James was a bit too annoying (yes I know it was dramatised and all the characters were over-animated, but still!)
  • Ron was made to look a little bit too hapless and inadequate compared to his peers. I felt this was a bit of a disservice to his character from the books who was so much more than a ‘dumb sidekick’
  • No Hugo Granger-Weasley? It just seems like a bit of a gaping hole